Saturday, August 31, 2013

Stages of Islamic Fundamentalism Rule 5

We have seen plenty of Muslim leaders who wives are highly western in dress and custom.  Queen Rania of Jordan and Asma al Assad of Syria come immediately to mind.  

Update:  
The Blogfather, by linking the Daily Mail, notes that Asam al Assad is partying on the eve of the Wrath of Obama like its 1999... How heteropatriarchial of him!  

But this photograph below captures the transition that often happens with so called adoption "modest" Islamic dress.  


Update:
Meanwhile cowardly feminists deride those who respond with mockery and derision to Miley Cyrus's shameful performance at the VMA, but ignore how women are routinely murdered, brutalized and marginalized in the Muslim world.  Why is that?  And we have so called progressives, who are trying to push the envelope on having sex with children, and those of us who speak out against that are called haters?  

12 comments:

  1. Like most countries in the Fertile Crescent, Syria is fairly secular.

    I can see why the war there is so bitter.

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    1. Secular, yes and no. The Alawites are secular. A lot of other groups in Syria are secular. There is still a Christian minority there. But the Alawites have been suppressing fundamentalism for a long time and the rivalries are deep and bitter. Iran has been promoting Shia extremists through Hezbollah and the Saudi Wahhabists/Salafists have been promoting Sunni extremists that are in some cases al Qaeda affiliated.

      Yugoslavia was secular too and we saw how that turned out when it broke apart.

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  2. When you consider that women are the principle victims, it's strange that they seem to go along with the program so willingly. (Lemmings?)

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  4. When fear is removed as a motivator, such as when an immigrant in the United States...that sequence of photos has it right, but backwards. By the 2nd generation they look like photo 1, by the 3rd or 4th they look like everyone else. My neighborhood is 90% Arab Muslim. 65% of the women look like Photo #1, maybe 25% like Photo#2 or #3, and a scant minority like the rest of the photos....in my 30 years living here I've seen only one that looked anything like the second to last photo.

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    1. I'd never seen any past picture 4, then I went to London. My initial impression was someone was holding an early Halloween party with kids dressed up as ghosts. The man leading them in front looked pretty pissed, so perhaps fear wasn't removed.

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    2. I saw at least level 6 in a park in Germany in 2005. I wasn't paying attention enough to notice whether her hands were covered as well. There were small kids too and they weren't cloaked. The look really draws attention for westerners, which it is not supposed to do.

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    3. I never saw beyond level six in Egypt, but even that level was rare there. I definitely saw it in the Gulf States.

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  5. Everyone of course notices that we, the US of A, are sponsoring violent sectarian political groups, not secular governments with at least a modicum of religious freedom, in the Middle East. Right? I'll wait .....

    *crickets*

    We sponsored a dictator who violated his nation's constitution in Honduras versus the judicial and legislative branch. Now we support the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, then Al Qaeda & Hezbollah in Syria...which will insure a decade of sectarian civil war if Assad falls.

    Why the fuck would anyone look up to us anymore. I find it downright embarrassing.

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  6. Your photo's don't go back far enough in time. As short as 10-15 years ago, women in Syria were dressing in western style clothes, with no scarfs on their head and certainly no hijab. Times have changed, so sad.

    See for yourself here... http://news.yahoo.com/photos/syria-history-of-politics-and-conflict-from-1920-to-2013-slideshow/

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    1. You are absolutely correct. But go back even a bit farther. Dress codes in Syria, Lebanon, and Egypt during the 70s and 80s were very western (at least in Damascus, Beirut and Cairo/Alexandria). That was also true in Tehran and even to a limited extent Kabul at the time.

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    2. Thank you. I will link that to a new post.

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